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ISLAMIC CHINOISERIE THE ART OF MONGOL IRAN PDF

Request PDF on ResearchGate | On Jan 1, , George Lane and others published Islamic Chinoiserie: The Art of Mongol Iran (Edinburgh Studies in Islamic. Islamic Chinoiserie: The Art of Mongol Iran (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, paperback, ). Yuka Kadoi. Uploaded by. Yuka Kadoi. Files. 1 of 2. The Mongol invasion in the thirteenth century marked a new phase in the development of Islamic art. Trans-Eurasian exchanges of goods, people and ideas.

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This illustrated book offers a fascinating glimpse into the artistic interaction between Iran and China under the Mongols.

Islamic Chinoiserie: The Art of Mongol Iran

The Minaret Jonathan M. A presentation by theme rather than material or a presentation of individual objects would have spared the author repetitions and turned the book into a handy catalog of Chinese elements in Mongol Islamic art.

Iconography in paintings clearly displays the multi-religious environment that was taking place in Ilkhanid Iran. With the fascination of portable objects brought from China and Central Asia, a distinctive, hitherto unknown style – Islamic chinoiserie – was born in the art of Iran.

It has long been accepted that the formation of the Mongol Empire by Chinggis Khan at the beginning of the thirteenth century was one of the defining moments in world history. However an overview of the phenomenon has yet to be made. Examples are images of dragons and phoenixes. The lecture was based on her most recent publication Islamic Chinoiserie: By using rich visual materials from various media of decorative and pictorial arts – textiles, ceramics, metalwork and manuscript painting – the book illustrates the process of adoption and adaptation of Chinese themes in the art of Mongol-ruled Iran in a visually compelling way.

A cultural history of Islamic textilesCambridge University Press,and Culture and conquest in Mongol EurasiaCambridge University Press,is a model for Islamic, Chinese and Mongol studies to build the cultural, historical, religious, economic… panorama that can explain Islamic Chinoiserie.

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The observation of this unique artistic phenomenon serves to promote the understanding of the artistic diversity of Islamic art in the Middle Ages. Leiden, Brill,p. ot

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Read, highlight, and take notes, across web, tablet, and phone. Published by Edinburgh University Press.

The dragon symbolized the emperor of China, but Iran transferred the symbol to refer to the Mongol rulers in Iran.

The Art of Mongol Iran. My library Help Advanced Book Search.

Islamic Chinoiserie

Yuka Kadoi joins the discussion at this point. From a cultural isamic of view however, this museological approach tends to strip objects of their context, an effect that is counterproductive for explaining Islamic Chinoiserie motifs which were mostly independent of the medium.

Trans-Eurasian exchanges of goods, people and ideas were encouraged on a large scale under the auspices of the Pax Mongolica. Abstracta Iranica Revue bibliographique pour le domaine irano-aryen.

Edinburgh University Press- Art – pages. The Mongol Empire was the largest contiguous land empire in history, connecting the two edges of the Eurasian land mass under a single political authority. The Art of Mongol Iran. Key Features covers various media of decorative and pictorial arts monogl Iran, Central Asia and China deals with a diverse range of issues related to the East-West artistic relationship in the Middle Ages features in-depth studies of style, technique and iconography in Iranian art under the Mongols includes illustrations, 24 in colour.

Sections are also devoted to objects selected by functionality or origin, such as mirrors or the metalwork of the Chiboiserie Horde. The Mongol invasion in the thirteenth century marked a new phase in the development of Islamic art. The lecture focused on how Chinese artistic styles were ialamic in Iranian art under the Mongols through textiles, ceramics, metalwork and paintings. The book merits the exquisite mongl found in the first editionnot the second in ! Reframing the Alhambra Olga Bush.

West Asia meets East Asia 1.

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Articles by Nancy Shatzman Steinhardt on the copy Chinese paintings by medieval central Asian artists are an excellent example of the minute inquires needed at the level of individual objects before any overview can be made.

The Chinese phoenix was also reworked in Ilkhanid Iran. Emon, Matthew Levering, and David Novak. Abstracta Iranica Revue bibliographique pour le domaine irano-aryen Briefly: One interesting image that was adopted in Islamic Iran from China was the lotus motif, which appears mpngol textiles, manuscripts, metalwork and architectural decorations.

Through imported textiles in Iran, Chinese artistic concepts were adopted. Many of the Chinese ceramic pieces, designs and styles were copied by Iranian potters as well as adopted with more added decorative elements.

Perhaps the lotus acquired a new symbolic meaning in the Islamic Iranian context. Trans-Eurasian exchanges of goods, people and ideas were encouraged on a large scale under the auspices of chinoiserje Pax Mongolica. The lotus motif originates from Buddhist China.

Yuka Kadoi, now at the Art Institute of Chicago, has accomplished this work due to her double background in Chinese chinoiseire Islamic studies. Iran depicted dragon-like creatures as a snake, but after the Mongol invasion, Iranian depiction of dragons incorporated Chinese style but was combined with their own decorative motifs. Book paintings are the major section in this volume, with a focus on pre Ilkhanid examples from northwestern Iran and on regional manuscripts.

Islamic Iran adopted this lotus motif monyol adapted it to their designs creating a more stylized version than the Chinese lotus.

Beyond the Silk Road 2. The Mongols were very interested in textiles and used it as a is,amic of art propaganda. Highly illustrated, Islamic Chinoiserie offers a fascinating glimpse into the artistic interaction between Iran and China under the Mongols.